MTA, TWU Local 100 Contract ratified

The contract between the MTA and TWU Local 100 was formally ratified February 15th by the union’s rank-and-file members. The contract was approved by union members by a 70-30 margin according to the TWU Local 100 website. When the contract was still in the voting process, the union’s Executive Board voted 37-6 in favor of the agreement. Union members who are employed by MTA-NYCT, MTA Bus, and MTA-MABSTOA are covered under the 28-month deal. Tentatively agreed upon before the retirement of former MTA CEO and Chairman Tom Prendergast, the deal was reached just hours after its expiration in January.

Some of the perks according to sources are:

  • 2.5% raise retroactive to January 15th, a year after the expiration of the former contract, culminating in a 5% raise over the life of the contract.
  • $500 bonus for the final two months of the contract.
  • Commuter rail passes for employees who live in the city as well as improved shoes that can stand up to their work environment.
  • Construction improvements for workplace facilities.
  • “..fully protects their health coverage and wins important medical benefit gains without the concessions that are enshrined in city and state public sector patterns. It secures an unprecedented “me too” wage guarantee with the LIRR unions, which have the right to strike and are governed by federal law and wage patterns set by the national freight and commuter railroad sectors.”, as quoted by TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen on the Union’s website.

The Union’s President also further assured members by stating in the same article, “The contract does not lock us into a long-term commitment, which provides an important hedge against any unforeseen spike in inflation. For the first time, this contract has secured an agreement from the MTA to hire and utilize in house forces to retrofit the older parts of the transit infrastructure to provide clean, comfortable and safe crew areas for our sisters in transit.” This is referring to the reported 100 or more members that will be added to the construction crew that will be improving the work facilities. Please read the articles below for more information.

Members Vote 70-30 to Ratify New Contract with the MTA

NYC transit workers ratify new MTA contract increasing raises

 

New contract agreement pending between MTA, TWU Local 100

At midnight on January 15th, the contract between MTA and TWU Local 100 expired. After several rocky weeks of negotiations, the MTA and TWU Local 100 found common ground on Monday, January 16th. Although still in the process of ratification, the union’s Executive Board voted 37-6 in support of the agreement according to the TWU Local 100 website. The union heads have expressly stated their support for the tentative contract. An article in The Chief Leader states that once the union members get the contract, the full and final vote on the acceptance or denial of the agreements will take about two weeks.

This comes in the wake of a difficult year for the MTA and TWU Local 100. In November, one employee was critically injured and another was killed on the same day while setting up warning lights for overnight construction. This event was undoubtedly at the forefront of the issues addressed during negotiations. A common theme was that union members did not feel properly compensated for the daily risks they take and possible hazards they are subjected to while operating public transit. The contract’s new guidelines were made to create safer environment for all workers. Several accomplishments of the contract were highlighted on the TWU Local 100 website. Some of them were the 5% raise rate over the life of the contract,  more comfortable uniforms, and lengthened healthcare coverage for workers’ dependents. There are also some benefits specifically for women, considering the ever-growing rate of women in this field. Some of these include improved locker rooms and changing facilities as well as private, comfortable spaces for new mothers to pump breast milk. On top of the supported negotiations, another win was that the tentative agreement has been made before the current MTA President, Thomas Prendergast, is set to retire.

However, members did have their criticisms about certain issues-specifically in relation to the raise and the pensionable bonus at the end of the now-tentative contract. Currently on the table for member approval are two 2.5 % raises and a $500 pensionable bonus once the contract expires. “A survey of several Local 100 members who were on the job last week, and did not want their names used, ranged from an upbeat “I can work with it” to a disapproving “I would have rather had a third 2.5 percent in the third step rather than the $500 in the payout” critique.”, as quoted from The Chief Leader.

TWU Leader Points To Above-Inflation Raises, Other Gains in Pact

Tentative deal reached between MTA, Transport Workers Union

 

 

TWU Local 100 sparks changes after recent MTA death

This past November, one MTA track worker was killed after being hit by a subway train and another was seriously injured. Subway train service was up and running while the two men, Jeffrey Fleming and the late Louis Gray Jr., were putting up yellow warning lights-the lights that were supposed to help avoid this same tragic situation. In a deal established earlier this month between the MTA and the TWU Local 100 union, the MTA has agreed to halt all subway activity whenever workers are setting up warning lights prior to construction projects in areas that are deemed particularly dangerous. Another condition to the deal is outlined in an article on TheChiefLeader.com-“According to the agreement signed by the MTA and the union, there has to be a look-out whose only task is to maintain visual and audible communications with the flagging crew, which must be at least 50 feet away from the look-out.” The new legal regulations were signed December 2nd to protect flaggers and track workers from putting their lives at risk.  “This is a big win for the safety of New York City transit workers,” Local 100 President John Samuelsen said. “Past efforts to get the company to even slow the trains down were extremely difficult. Now, the trains must not only slow down but completely suspend service and this is unprecedented.”, as quoted from TWULocal100.com. The website also states that the National Transportation Safety Board not only approved of the regulations, but that there was a “24 hour safety stand down” on Wednesday, the 7th, to inform the workers of the new regulations. All non-emergency track work was stopped while the stand-down took place.